It all starts with copy

Mar 21 2008

As if I’ve got nothing better to do, I’ve been following the William & Mary web redesign effort via the blog and the dedicated project website.

Very jealously, mind you.  The efforts they seem to be expending to involve their constituents and keep them aware of the redesign process are going to pay dividends.

redesign

…from the initial concepts offered up my mStoner, through the amazing news and events design preview and down to today’s post previewing the new copy for William & Mary’s admissions page.

I’m no writer, but I know great copy when I see it:

Undergraduate Admission
Don’t let our looks fool you. We have big brains under all our beauty.

William & Mary consistently attracts the most exceptionally talented high school seniors from Virginia and across the world. Last year, nearly 11,000 applicants fought for 1,350 spots in William & Mary’s class of 2011. Take a look at the numbers for this year’s freshmen:

* 87% graduated in top 10% of their class
* the middle 50th percentile on SAT was 1310-1470
* the class includes 77 high school valedictorians and 33 salutatorians

But what really sets W&M students apart is a passion for learning. There are no one-dimensional eggheads around here. (Though there are enough smart alecs for us to anticipate some crack about eggs being three dimensional.) Chemistry majors write poetry for the literary magazine, business majors volunteer in soup kitchens, and football players star in Shakespeare. It’s all part of the proud intellectual culture at W&M, extending from the classroom to the dorm room and everywhere in between.

Yes, we work hard. But that’s because we’re working on things that we love. Our professors—hands down the most committed and engaged in the country—inspire us to go one step further, to challenge conventional wisdom and uncover new truths.

2 responses so far

  1. Good promotional copy. The news site redesign looks good, too.

  2. […] College Web Guy “The efforts they seem to be expending to involve their constituents and keep them aware of the redesign process are going to pay dividends.” […]

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